Fenit Live Cam

Situated in Tralee bay, just South of the Shannon Estuary

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County Kerry - Ireland

Tralee and Fenit Harbour is situated in Tralee bay, just South of the Shannon Estuary. It is a comfortable day's sailing from both Dingle (44 nautical miles) and Kilrush (35 nautical miles) marinas. Set in magnificent scenery in the heart of County Kerry, the premier tourist destination in Ireland. It is a convenient base for visiting inland tourist towns such as Tralee and Killarny. Fenit is a small village located 12 km from Tralee, the capital of the County of Kerry. The population of Tralee is 25,000. There are two modern hospitals, a 3rd Level Institute of Technology, a theatre, cinemas and all the other trimmings of a major provincial town.

Prior to this cargo for Tralee was transported through Barrow Harbour, a natural sea inlet, just North of Fenit. Barrow was historically the port used to service Ardfert, now a village but in the monastic era it was a major ecclesiastical centre with students and monks from many parts of Europe. In the year 1880, the harbour at Fenit was built and the Harbour Board took on the name "Tralee and Fenit Pier and Harbour Board". In 1851 a lighthouse was built on the little Samphire Rock, located a few hunderd meters west of Fenit Pier.

A large bronze sculpture of Saint Brendan, the Navigator, was erected in 2004 on Great Samphire Island, the rock around which the harbour was built. Saint Brendan was probably born on Fenit Island just north west of the village.

Saint Brendan was born near Fenit in 484. He travelled extensively and founded several monasteries. Many places are named after him: places in Ireland, England, Scotland, the Faeroes and Brittany. There is compelling evidence to suggest that he visited Greenland; Iceland; Newfoundland and other places in North America; the Bahamas and other Caribbean Islands; the Azores and the Canary Islands. In the middle-ages, a book was written about his voyages; Navagatio Sancti Brendani - describing his voyages. This became, what would be today, a bestseller and was translated into many languages.

It described scenes of what can only be interpreted as volcanoes and icebergs. It was instrumental in influencing Christopher Columbus to set out for America. The traditional craft used in this period was made with leather over a wooden frame. Tim Severn, the modern-day explorer, studied up on St. Brendan and crossed the Atlantic in a replica boat. This boat is on display at Craggaunowen, a historical interpretative centre, near the village of Quinn in Co. Clare. Saint Brendan is buried, in the monastery which he founded, at Clonfert, a small village in south east of County Galway near Shannonbridge. Saint Brendan is the Patron Saint of the Navy of the United States of America. To mark the achievements of this much undervalued historical figure, a 5 metre high bronze monument was erected at the top of the Great Samphire Rock in Fenit Harbour.

Fenit Harbour is ideally suited as a base for exploration, support and supply ships operating off the South West of Ireland. The main deep-sea pier is 175m long. There are warehouses and open storage locations available.

Located in Tralee Bay, just south of the Shannon Estuary, Fenit Harbour is sheltered from the main Atlantic swell by the Maharee spit.



Fenit Harbour is a deep-sea port with a minimum of 5m draft alongside. The tide range is also 5m. Regularly accommodating 15,000 tonne ships, the port is not a busy one, with only about 12 shipments per year. This is almost totally due to the export of container cranes which are shipped all over the world. An 80 tonne all-terrain mobile crane is operated by the Harbour Board and is available at all times.

Comfortable days sailing from Dingle and Kilrush marinas. 110 berths (30 visitors berths) for boats from 6 metres to 30 metres, with access at all stages of the tide. As well as all the usual facilities, (electricity, water, fuelling berth), Fenit Harbour Marina has solid concrete decking which gives unrivaled stability in all weathers, smart-card access and video surveillance for extra security, and a wheelchair lift to allow the disabled to access yachts and sea-angling boats. Onshore facilities include showers, toilets, laundry-room, cranes, sailing club and excellent bars and restaurants.

Fenit Harbour Marina

Tralee Sailing Club (TSC) was formed at Fenit in 1956 by a group of local enthusiasts. The setting of the Club house sitting perched high on Tralee Bay near Fenit Harbour provides panoramic views from Blennerville Windmill over Tralee Bay to the Marahees and westward to Bandon Point.

Club Profile: Formed at Fenit in 1956, the Club has grown and now boasts a vibrant and expanding membership. In addition to the clubhouse, with changing facilities, showers, kitchen, storage and licensed bar, facilities at Fenit include a sheltered 110 berth marina. Cruiser racing takes place from April to October on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Dinghy racing is run on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

Located in Tralee Bay, just south of the Shannon Estuary, a comfortable days sailing from Dingle and Kilrush marinas. 110 berths (30 visitors berths) for boats from 6 metres to 30 metres, with access at all stages of the tide. As well as all the usual facilities, (electricity, water, fuelling berth), Fenit Harbour Marina has solid concrete decking which gives unrivaled stability in all weathers, smart-card access and video surveillance for extra security, and a wheelchair lift to allow the disabled to access yachts and sea-angling boats. Onshore facilities include showers, toilets, laundry-room, cranes, sailing club and excellent bars and restaurants.

Holidaying in Kerry

County Kerry has an abundance of rich culture, heritage, spectacular scenery and amenities. The county plays host to natural and man made attractions, Kerry entertains both residents and millions of tourists, offering them a quality of lifestyle unrivalled anywhere in the world.

Kerry is internationally renowned as Ireland's premier tourist County, mainly because of its spectacular physical features. Killarney and its hinterland is probably one of the best known tourist destinations in Europe.

The term ‘Gaeltacht’ is used to denote those areas in Ireland where the Irish language is spoken as a community language. The Kerry Gaeltacht is located in the west and south of the county. Its culture and traditions are very much alive and thriving. The Ring of Kerry (Irish An Mhór Chuaird) is a tourist trail covering 179 kms of breathtaking scenery starting from Killarney.

The Golf Courses of Kerry are some of the finest with Ballybunion Old Course recognised as the number one course in the world outside America. In close competition with this are Killarney, Waterville, Barrow, as well as ten other courses scattered all over the County.

There are a number of excellent walking routes over the most scenic areas are available in the Kerry Way, Dingle Way and North Kerry Way along with Slí Chorcha Duibne and many other equally interesting trips

Many new visitor attractions have been developed in recent years, particularly in the Tralee area, such as The Geraldine Centre, Kerry County Museum, Blennerville Windmill and Tralee Aqua Dome. Other visitor attractions are being developed in various locations to add to the already well-known places of interest, such as Muckross House, and Muckross Interpretative Centre, Ardfert Cathedral, Gallarus Oratory, Siamsa Tíre (National Folk Theatre), the Skellig Experience and the Great Blasket Island Interpretative Centre, and Dingle Marina and Aquarium.