An Introduction to the Communities of Northwestern Connecticut

Northwest Hills - also known as the Northwest Highlands or Litchfield Hills

An Introduction to the Communities of Northwestern Connecticut

Town Of Barkhamsted

The town of Barkhamsted was incorporated in October 1779, and covers a land area of 39 square miles. It has a population of 3337, and is run by Selectmen, Town Meeting and a Board of Finance. Barkhamsted has one elementary school, the Barkhamsted Elementary School. Junior and senior high school students attend Regional School #7 in Winsted. Barkhamsted is a rich recreational area with three state forests; People's Forest, American Legion Forest, and Enders Forest; one lake, Lake McDonough; and one pond, West Hill Pond. Post offices are located in Riverton and Pleasant Valley. There is a rural delivery from Winsted, New Hartford, North Canton and Collinsville. The Barkhamsted area has three churches: Pleasant Valley United Methodist, Riverton Congregational Church and Barkhamsted Congregational Church.

Town Of Colebrook

Colebrook Center has changed little since the town was incorporated in 1776, and the area is now a historic district. A quiet, rural town, Colebrook offers brooks and streams for fishing and many wooded areas. It is located in the hills north of Winsted and west of Hartland. It is about 45 minutes away from Hartford, our Capital. The population today is smaller than it was in the 1800's. The center of Colebrook has one General store, a Congregational Church, Town Hall Historic Society building, a U.S. Post Office and several Colonial homes around the green. The public school system includes one elementary school in town, K through 6 grade. Middle school and high school students attend Regional School #7, which is located in Barkhamsted on the border of Winsted. Colebrook Pond Recreational Area offers a little league field, multi-purpose skating rink/basketball court, swimming and picnicking.

The Colebrook Dam, near the Massachusetts state line, allows fishing and boating. There is a volunteer fire department in town. Social organizations in Colebrook include a Lions Club, Girl and Boy Scouts, Historical Society, Garden Club, Woman's Club and an agent for the elderly.

Town Of Cornwall

Cornwall is a scenic old town, very rural and sparsely populated. A large summer population visits here, enjoying the pleasant surroundings and tranquillity. Cornwall, covering some 47 square miles, was incorporated in 1740 and today has a population of approximately 1430. It is governed by a Board of Finance, a Board of Selectmen and a Town Meeting. The town's Hughes Memorial Library is located in West Cornwall, Post offices are found in Cornwall Village, Cornwall Bridge, and West Cornwall; there is rural delivery from Falls Village, Goshen and Litchfield. Elementary school students attend the Cornwall Consolidated School. Junior and senior high school students attend Housatonic Valley Regional High School in Falls Village and Oliver Wolcott Regional Vocational Technical School in Torrington.

Cultural organizations include the Historical Society, Cornwall Association, Masonic Lodge, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Fire Department/Rescue Squad. FISH, Girl Scouts, the Cornwall Library Association and church groups. For recreation, Cornwall is the home of the Mohawk State forest, the Mohawk Ski Area (day and night skiing ), Cream Hill Lake with the beach facilities for town residents, and the Cream Hill Lake Association, a private membership club which provides tennis and swimming. Of particular scenic note is the red covered bridge at West Cornwall, spanning the Housatonic River and presenting to visitors a glimpse of life in the 1800's. There are three churches in Cornwall: United Church of Christ Congregational, St. Peter's Lutheran and St. Bridget's.

Town Of Canaan/falls Village

Canaan celebrated it's 250th Anniversary in 1989. It was incorporated in 1739, has a population of 1,050 and covers an area of 33.4 square miles. It is governed by a Town Meeting and a Board of Selectmen. Lee H Kellogg Elementary School has 130 pupils enrolled and the 50 high school students from Canaan attend Housatonic Valley Regional High School. There is a post office located on Miner Street and there is one library, the D.M. Hunt Library.

Canaan is a National Historic District. Among the sites to see in Canaan are the South Canaan Meeting House and The Great Falls. Canaan is home of two state parks. They are: Housatonic State Forest and Robbins Swamp Wildlife Preserve and the Appalachian Trail. There is a town recreational area and the Housatonic River supplies exciting canoeing and kayaking. Cultural organizations include the Music Mountain and the Summer Chamber Music Shed. There are two churches in the Canaan area: the Falls Village Congregational Church and St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church.

Town Of Goshen

Goshen is a picturesque, vital community in the heart of Litchfield County. Its country charm and agricultural appearance are enhanced by beautiful lakes, gentle hills offering wide vistas and dense forests. Although within easy reach of major commercial and industrial centers, Goshen's own recently updated Plan of Development continues to reflect the desire of its residents to retain the rural character of the town and to build upon the high level of community involvement by its citizens. Goshen offers many opportunities to be part of a town that cares, a town strengthened by strong traditions of fellowship and service of friends and neighbors through civic, church and non-secretarian organizations.

Goshen is governed by a Board of Selectmen and Town Meeting supported by many elected and appointed town officials, boards, commissions and committees. Zoning was adopted in 1988 and much of the town is covered by 2 and 5 acre residential zones. Agricultural, forest and qualifying open space lands registered under provisions of state statutes benefit from reduced tax assessments. Protection of the watersheds within the town is also a prime objective for Goshen's land use regulations. A small business zone near the town center and many permitted businesses in other areas of town provide for supply of basic needs and for many services. Major shopping facilities are only minutes away in Torrington and Litchfield.

Electric and telephone service is available and all areas of town are wired for cable television access. There are no municipal gas or water systems. A limited area has sewers. Regional School District #6 provides public education for children in grades K through 6 at Goshen Center School and for children in higher grades, Wamogo Regional High School in nearby Litchfield. School bus service is provided to all students. Special programs for the learning disabled and vocational and agricultural programs are also offerred. Many finr private schools are located in nearby communities.

Church of Christ Congregational and St. Thomas of Villanova Roman Catholic Church are long established active Goshen congregations. Both support many civic, social, and charitable groups, offer educational opportunities, and both make their facilities available to those groups and for special events, such as monthly Sunday breakfasts, annual blueberry festivals, harvest dinners, chicken barbecues, and corned beef dinners. The church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Goshen serves congregants from many other communities in the county.

Community organizations include: Goshen Hospice, Goshen Volunteer Fire Company, Goshen Business and Professional Association, and Goshen Garden Club, Goshen Lions Club, Goshen Agricultural Society, and Goshen Running Club.

Recreational programs include: Camp Cochipianee, a Town park on Dog Pond; the Goshen Fair; Ice Fishing Derby on Tyler Lake; the Goshen Running Club's annual Turkey Trot; and the Goshen Player's annual revivals of Broadway musicals featuring the best of local talent in spirited performances.

Town Of Harwinton

Harwinton was settled in 1730, named after Hartford and Windsor in 1732, and incorporated in 1737. Today, Harwinton is primarily a bedroom community with some elements of manufacturing and agriculture. Harwinton covers 32 square miles. There is one voting district for the House of Representatives and two for the Senate. Recreational facilities include public playgrounds with summer activities, athletic programs for youth and special activities for senior citizens. Three public tennis courts and two athletic fields are also available.

There is one elementary school, as well as the HarBur (for Harwinton/Burlington) middle school for six, seventh and eight graders and the Lewis S. Mills Regional High School. Facilities fir the handicapped and programs for all levels of special education are available.

Of historic interest is the First District or Center School House in Harwinton which was used until the Harwinton Consolidated School opened in September 1948. In 1970, several residents who recognized the historical value of this school house formed the Harwinton Historical Society to restore it.

Churches are Catholic and Cogregational. While other denominations and religions are represented in nearby towns. Social organizations include the Lions Club, Boys and Girls Scouts, Garden Club, Horseman's Club, Women's Club, a social group for seniors and 4-H. Harwinton is well-known for its fair, held each October since 1855.

Town Of Kent

Kent was incorporated in 1739. Located on Route 7 above Danbury and New Milford in the Housatonic Valley, Kent is a peaceful rural town with friendly citizens who contribute to their community. Kent is a primarily residential town well known for its two private educational institutions - The Kent School ans The South Kent School. There is one public school facility, the Kent Center School (K-8), while high school students attend Housatonic Regional High School in Falls Village.

Ther is a quaint downtown shopping area with a supermarket and other retail shops. Cultural organizations include the Kent Art Association and the Kent Historical Society. Kent is governed by a Board of Selectman and Town Meeting. Kent's legislative districts include the 67th Assembly District and 30th Senatorial District (state) and the 6th Congressional District (federal).

Kent has three churches: Sacred Heart Roman Catholic, Saint Andrew's Episcopal, and First Congressional. Popular recreational areas in the town are Kent Falls, Macedonia Brook, Lake Waramaug State Park and Wyantenock State Forest.

Historical buildings include the Bulls Bridge, Swift House and the George Nelson House. The Sloane-Stanley Museum's display of colonial crafts is another Kent attraction. Kent's social organizations include the American Legion, Lions Club, Masons Grange, Boys and Girls Scouts, Historical Society, Garden Club and Sharon Hospital Auxiliary.

Town Of Salisbury / Lakeville

Salisbury, located off Route 44, twenty-five miles west of Winsted, was incorporated in 1741. It covers nearly 61 square miles and has a population of approximately 4,050. The town is run by Selectmen, a Town Meeting and a Board of Finance. Salisbury is home to the first lending library in the U.S., the Scoville Memorial Library, and the oldest continuous Methodist Church in the U.S. Also, the Holley Williams House and Cannon Museum contain artifacts and displays of local , 19th century history.

Salisbury Central School, the town's one elementary school, is located in the Lakeville section. Junior and senior high school students attend the Housatonic Valley Regional High School. There are also four private institutions in the area: The Hotchkiss School, The Salisbury School, Indian Mountain School and The Town Hill School. For recreation, there is the Berkshire Hills Music and Dance Company, fishing for bass, lake trout and salmon at Lakeville Lake and Twin Lakes (where there is also a private marina), ski jumping in the winter, the Appalachian Trail, biking trails and a small, state-maintained scenic hiking area off Route 41 north of Salisbury.

The area is also the site of Lime Rock Park where motor sports enthusiasts from across New England and points west gather to enjoy a full schedule of racing from spring through fall. Salisbury has five churches that serve the area: The Church of Christ Congregational, St. John's Episcopal, Lake Methodists, Trinity Church, and St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church.

Town Of Litchfield

Litchfield was incorporated in 1719 by an act of the Colonial Assembly of Connecticut on lands bought in 1716 from the Tunxis Indians for 15 pounds. In 1720 the first settlers took up the 60 home lots and the settlement grew and prospered. The town became the county seat in 1751. By 1810, Litchfield's population reached 4,639, and it was the fourth largest town in Connecticut. Since then, the population has risen to 8,365 (1990 census).

There are many points of historical interest in Litchfield. Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of "Uncle Tom's Cabin", and her brother Henry Ward Beecher, the great abolishionist preacher of the pre-Civil War Period were born in Litchfield. America's first law school, the Tapping Reeve Law School, has it's beginnings in Litchfield in 1775. Many of its graduates went on to become famous and distinguished, including two Vice Presidents, three Justices of the Supreme Court and many others. The school closed in 1833, however, the Law School building has been restored to its original site and, along with the Tapping Reeve House, is owned and maintained by the Litchfield Historical Society. Both buildings are open to the public from from mid-May to mid-October.

Some of Litchfield's historical houses still stand today including : Sheldon's Tavern, The Oliver Wolcott, Sr. House, The Alexander Catlin House and the Home of Colonial Benjamin Tallmadge of Revolutionary War fame. All are now in private hands with selected ones open to the public on Litchfield's Open House Day, held annually on the second Saturday in July, as a benefit for the Connecticut Junior Republic.

Recreational activies include: The Litchfield Nature Center and Museum; White Memorial Foundation; Litchfield Community Field offering tennis and basketball courts, running track, 3 ballfields, a pavillion for picnics, and a community built playscape; Topsmead State Forest; Lourdes in Litchfield Shrine Grotto; Haight Vineyard; and Mt. Tom State Park. Litchfield is not striving to become a bustling commercial center; however, it is growing and developing in an orderly manner. It's beauty and charm are a constant attraction to the discriminating individual looking for the ideal place to live.

Town Of Morris

Settled in 1721, the town was named after James Morris, who founded the Morris Academy in 1790 at South Farms (South Farms was an early name for Morris). James Morris became a pioneer in co-education when he enrolled girls as well as boys at his Academy. At one time, the town was a section of Litchfield before its independent incorporation in 1859. Sections of Morris include Deer Island, Bantam Lake, East Morris and Lakeside. The town covers 19 square miles and has a population of approximately 2,000. The principal business activities are manufacturing at the Torrington Company, agriculture, and small machine shops. Schools include the James Morris Elementary School and Regional District #6 (Wamogo High School, located in Litchfield). Places of worship include the Morris Congregational Church and Catholic Mission Church in East Morris. Points of interest include the Tower on Mt. Tom, Windrush Farm, and Bantam Lake, which at 916 acres, is the largest natural body of water in Connecticut.

Town Of New Hartford

New Hartford, a rural town of 5,910 that spans 38 square miles, was settled in 1733 amidst the scenic Litchfield Hills six miles east of Winchester. Nepaug and Bakerville are sections of New Hartford as are Pine Meadow and Satan's Kingdom - so named for the bandits who lurked in the gorges and held up the Hartford to Albany stage coach.

Before the advent of the railroad, Bakerville and Nepaug comprised the industrial center of New Hartford and, in the 1850's, there were 92 diverse industries located along the Nepaug River where craftsmen were engaged in making ax handles, carriages, casters, clothing, turnings, shoes, scythes, and various other necessary items which were shipped throughout the country. During the second half of the last century, New Hartford was known nationwide for its manufacture of planes, rules, levels, gauges, and cotton duck. Though industry dwindled to practically nothing for a period, New Hartford is once again a thriving industrial town.

Today, in addition to agriculture, New Hartford's principal industries are the manufacture of plumbing supplies, aircraft parts, electrical components, business forms, food processors, blenders, tool dies, coil springs, musical stringed instruments, pins and fine furniture. Among its most well-known products are Hitchcock Furniture, Ovation guitars and Waring Blenders.

Stanclift Cove Recreation Area, situated in the tall pines on Lake McDonough, provides the residents of New Hartford with crystal clear water, sandy beaches and a well supervised swimming area for their summer recreational enjoyment. The Cove, supported through the town appropriations and the proceeds from the sale of season tickets, is open to any resident of New Hartford or Barkhamsted. Life guards supervise the area from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

West Hill Pond, a hilltop lake in the Northwestern corner of New Hartford, provides some of the finest trout fishing in the state, as does the Farmington River, along its entire course from Pleasant Valley to the Satan's Kingdom Gorge. Both downhill and cross-country skiing are available from December to April at Ski Sundown on numerous runs and trails. West Hill Pond also offers a town beach at Brodie Park with a picnic area. The Park and Recreation Department offers a variety of summer camp programs, and extensive playing fields among their many recreational programs.

Six churches contribute to the ecclesiastical and cultural activities of the town. There are also three schools: the New Hartford Elementary School in Pine Meadow; Bakerville Consolidated School in Bakerville. Students in grades 7-12 attend Northwestern Regional School #7 in Winsted.

The Winsted Memorial Hospital serves residents of New Hartford, as does the Charlotte Hungerford Hospital in Torrington. Both are full-service hospitals with full staffed emergency rooms and utilizing the latest equipment.

Town Of Norfolk

Norfolk is located on Route 44, nine miles west of Winsted and fourteen miles northwest of Torrington. It covers approximately 47 square miles. Incorporated in 1758, Norfolk boasts lovely scenery and three state parks. Concerts and art exhibits enliven the town during the summer months. There is one elementary school in town, Botelle Elementary School. Junior and senior high school students attend Regional School district #7 in Winsted. There are several churches serving Norfolk and adjoining communities. The town offers swimming and tennis lessons, two public tennis courts, a beach, and a private golf course. Hiking, cross-country skiing and youth athletic leagues are also available to the public.

Town Of North Canaan

North Canaan, located at the junctions of Routes 44 and 7, covers some 17 square miles. Incorporated in 1858 when separated from the town of Canaan / Falls Village.

North Canaan's younger children go to the North Canaan Elementary School; junior and senior high school students attend the Housatonic Valley Regional High School in town. North Canaan is run by Selectmen, a Town Meeting and a Board of Finance. Geer Memorial Hospital provides health care for the elderly. Post offices are located in East Canaan on Route 44, and on Church Street in downtown Canaan . The public library is the Douglas Library, and there is one private airport (the Canaan Airport). Bonanza Bus Lines stops at Canaan's Union Station, which is the oldest operating Railroad Station in the country with freight trains still passing through daily.

Of historic interest is the Canaan Union Railroad Station, where the East-West Track Hartford to New York state met the North-South line from Danbury to Albany. Camping at Lone Oak, swimming in the town pool, and winter sports are just a few of the many activities available. There are six churches in North Canaan: St. Joseph's R.C., Christ Church Episcopal, Methodist, North Canaan Congregational, North Canaan Baptist, and Seven Day Adventist Church.

Town Of Salisbury / Lakeville

Salisbury, located off Route 44, twenty-five miles west of Winsted, was incorporated in 1741. It covers nearly 61 square miles and has a population of approximately 4,050. The town is run by Selectmen, a Town Meeting and a Board of Finance. Salisbury is home to the first lending library in the U.S., the Scoville Memorial Library, and the oldest continuous Methodist Church in the U.S. Also, the Holley Williams House and Cannon Museum contain artifacts and displays of local , 19th century history. Salisbury Central School, the town's one elementary school, is located in the Lakeville section. Junior and senior high school students attend the Housatonic Valley Regional High School. There are also four private institutions in the area: The Hotchkiss School, The Salisbury School, Indian Mountain School and The Town Hill School.

For recreation, there is the Berkshire Hills Music and Dance Company, fishing for bass, lake trout and salmon at Lakeville Lake and Twin Lakes (where there is also a private marina), ski jumping in the winter, the Appalachian Trail, biking trails and a small, state-maintained scenic hiking area off Route 41 north of Salisbury. The area is also the site of Lime Rock Park where motor sports enthusiasts from across New England and points west gather to enjoy a full schedule of racing from spring through fall. Salisbury has five churches that serve the area: The Church of Christ Congregational, St. John's Episcopal, Lake Methodists, Trinity Church, and St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church.

Town Of Sharon

Sharon is a spacious residential community with a long history of agricultural achievement. Beautiful, old single family homes on large plots of land are the rule in this scenic town. Sharon was incorporated in 1739 and has a population of 2,930. It is located twenty-five miles west of Torrington, and covers approximately 60 square miles. Town children of elementary age attend the Sharon Center School, while high school students attend Regional District #1 Housatonic Valley Regional. There are approximately 300 students enrolled in Sharon's schools.

For recreation, Sharon offers tennis, swimming, volleyball, basketball and ice skating. There is a private golf course, a public beach, a community hall and youth athletic leagues. Also, there are two parks nearby - Housatonic Meadows State Park and Macedonia State Park. Sharon's historic points of interest include the Sharon Valley Kiln, where iron ore was processed; The Gay-Hoyt House, now the headquarters of the Sharon Historical Society; Calkinstown Road and the Sharon Green.

Sharon is served by five churches: St. Bridget's Roman Catholic, St. Bernard's Roman Catholic, Sharon United Methodist Church, Christ Church Episcopal and First Church of Christ Congregational. The town is run by a town meeting. There is one post office located in the Sharon Shopping Center. The town library is the Hotchkiss Library, and area medical service is provided by Sharon Hospital. Sharon is also the home of the cultural organization The Sharon Audubon, and Sharon Stage, a summer playhouse.

Town Of Thomaston

Thomaston is a typical New England town located along the Naugatuck River and Route 8, ten miles north of Waterbury and Interstate 84. The town's dedicated to preserving the historic charm and quiet, family aspects of the community as well as providing the resources necessary for the growth and development of business and industry.

Currently, the population of Thomaston is 6,947. This is expected to increase approximately 2% through the year 2000. Thomaston has a variety of housing units from which to choose, including single family homes, condominiums for ownership and rental and apartments.

The Thomaston public school system is governed by a nine member Board of Education. There are three public schools in the system. The Black Rock Elementary School was constructed in 1954 and services pre-school and kindergarten through third grade. The Thomaston Middle School was constructed in 1939 and completely remodeled in 1960. The school contains grades four through eight. The Thomaston High School offers both vocational and college track courses to grades nine through twelve. In addition to the three public schools, the St. Thomas Parochial School services kindergarten through six. There appears to be ample room for expansion and population growth in the future without an undue burden to the Town's budget process.

Thomaston prides itself in the dedication and performance of its volunteer Fire Department. For nine of the past eleven years, it has been recognized as Connecticut's best! Hospital services are provided to the Thomaston area by the Charlotte Hungerford Hospital in Torrington, and St. Mary's Hospital and the Waterbury Hospital in Waterbury.

Thomaston also has a wide variety of churches in most denominations which provide services to the community. There are numerous community service organizations and clubs in Thomaston which include but are limited to: Rotary International, LIons Club, Knights of Columbus, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and Scouting Troops.

The premiere entertainment attraction in Thomaston is the Opera House. Through the efforts of a number of volunteer organizations, the Opera House has been restored and now offers a wide range of venues for the community in terms of the performing arts. The Thomaston Recreation Department offers programs for all ages in baseball, softball, soccer, tennis, basketball, and any other sports.

There are several outdoor recreational facilities in town: Nystrom's Park, Thomaston Dam, Black Rock Dam and Northfield Brook Dam. These areas offer swimming, picnicking and hiking trails. Black Rock State Park is also located nearby in Watertown. In addition to these areas, there are several other recreational sites in the local area: golf courses, ski areas, outdoor recreational sites, bowling , dance schools, karate centers and video stores.

Town Of Torrington

The industrial and commercial hub of northwestern Connecticut, Torrington is Litchfield County's largest city with a population of 34,687 (1990 census). It is in the midst of a countryside noted for its scenic beauty.

Torrington is named after Great Torrington in Devonshire, England; was settled in 1737, incorporated as a town in 1740, as a borough in 1887, and as a city in 1923. John Brown, the abolitionist was born here, as was Reverend Samuel J. Mills, father of foreign missions. Torrington was the first home of America's brass industry and the first condensed milk plant in the world, established by Gail Borden.

There are 36 area manufacturing firms in the city, employing some 5,200 people, producing items that include anti-friction bearings, bronze and gray iron castings, gaskets, brushes, corrugated containers and plastic injection molding products.

The public library ranks with the best facilities in the state. There is one theater, twelve supervised summer playgrounds, five baseball fields, one football field and four tennis courts. Educational facilities are abundant, consisting of seven public elementary schools - including the brand new Torrington Middle School, two parochial elementary schools, a high school, a state technical school, and a branch of the University of Connecticut at the Litchfield County Center for Higher Education which provides the initial semesters of a four-year baccalaureate program.

Torrington has twenty-two churches, a synagogue, four commercial banks and one savings and loan association. A leading newspaper of Northwestern Connecticut is published here. A radio station covers the area news and activities. Charlotte Hungerford Hospital has a capacity of 191 beds and a medical staff number 70 attending and 30 consulting physicians. Charlotte Hungerford Hospital houses the only Dialysis unit in Northwestern Connecticut. There are several other health care facilities serving the area.

The Civic Theatre, Civic Symphony, Nutmeg Ballet Company, LItchfield County Barber Shop Chorus schedule performances throughout the year, some of them in the historic downtown Warner Theatre. The Annual Arts Festival, held each August in Coe Park, runs for a week with a different activity each day, from an outdoor art show, to ballet, to pop concerts and opera. Admission is free. In December, thousands relive the enchantment of their youth by visiting Christmas Village, an immensely popular attraction for all ages that has received national publicity.

Torrington is the home of the "Main Street Action Team". This program is modeled after the National Main Street Center in Washington D.C., and is the first community volunteers and provides assistance services to businesses and property owners to help guide the revitalization of downtown Torrington.

Town Of Warren

A rural town in western Connecticut, Warren is known for its farms, woods, hills and for Lake Waramaug, a popular resort area. The public school system includes one elementary school; junior and senior high school students attend Wamogo Regional High in Litchfield. There is one Congregational Church; other denominations worship in surrounding areas. Warren has public tennis courts, a town beach and athletic fields. Social organizations include the American Legion, Girl and Boy Scouts, Historical Society, Garden Club and the Grange. A volunteer fire company provides protection, and there is a public library. The town is governed by a Board of Selectmen and Town Meeting.

Town Of Winsted

The City of Winsted, a business and industrial center, lies within the Town of Winchester. First settled in 1732 by residents of Hartford, it was incorporated in 1771. It covers 34 square miles, and is located nine miles north of Torrington and 25 miles northwest of Hartford. Winsted and Winchester are both governed by the same seven-member Board of Selectmen. A Mayor is elected from the Board of Selectmen and a Town Manager is the full-time executive head. The present population is estimated at 11,281 with a work force of 5,000 people, most of whom are employed in local industry and commerce.

Winsted and Winchester have fine residential areas, excellent commercial facilities and diversified industries. Some if the products made here are electrical home appliances, electrical coils, metal balls for bearings, printed business forms, plastic products, corrugated containers, and screw machine products. Winchester is completely zoned and progressive in planing for future growth, having a Planning and Zoning Commission, Redevelopment Commission, Development and Industrial Commission and a Housing Authority that work jointly and independently to encourage new business to locate to the town.

Winsted's Main Street is a significant retail center fir Northwestern Connecticut and attracts many shoppers from the surrounding area. Winsted's one movie theater provides both film entertainment and dining in a unique combination. There are many recreational facilities including lakes, parks, ponds and summer camps. A golf course and community recreation field are also available. Fishing, boating and hunting are also enjoyed here.

The town has three public elementary schools and one junior high school. High school education is furnished at Gilbert School, provided for under an endowment by the late William L. Gilbert. Winsted's Northwestern Connecticut Community-Technical College offers a two-year program leading to an associate degree in arts or sciences. Library facilities are provided by the Northwestern Community-Technical College Library, the second largest library in Litchfield County and by the Beardsley & Memorial Library. The City of Winsted owns its own excellent water supply and distribution system with rates as low any in the state. A primary and secondary sewerage system is also operated by the City. Winsted has a fire department of five companies and a full-time police department.

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